Thursday, July 12, 2018

Bringing a Mobile Medical Clinic to Delone

When Dr. Gemima Jean and her husband Pastor Ruegens Jean married two years ago, they prayed for an opportunity so she could use her medical skills to serve their community. However, with no hospital or clinic in the area, she was forced to work in the regional capital, Gonaives, during the week.


Children wait patiently to see the doctor at the Delone Clinic.
Then came an opportunity to partner with Bright Hope to host a week-long mobile medical clinic in Delone. This region is known for its “voodoo,” or traditional African religious practices, and churches have encountered a great deal of opposition.

 

During the seven-day clinic, Pastor Jean provided spiritual guidance and counsel for patients while Dr. Gemima oversaw the medical program. Nearly 600 patients were seen (including more than 200 children), six people accepted Christ and several others showed significant interest. This was a wonderful outcome despite the clinic being hosted in an environment which has been extremely hostile to the Gospel message with three voodoo temples located nearby.

They also brought in a team of medical professionals and a couple of lay leaders who served as volunteers to undergird the mobile clinic spiritually. One of the lay volunteers, in particular, worked with Pastor Jean to pray with patients.

The 10-member visiting medical team was comprised of: two doctors, three nurses, one pharmacist, one nutritionist and three lay volunteers. Additionally, there was a local medical team consisting of one doctor and two nurses. The church organized approximately 30 volunteers throughout the week to help as well, including six experienced translators and a few local community members with fluency in English.


The newly trained first aid team helped care for patients at the Delone Clinic.

A key focus of the mobile clinic week was to train volunteers and equip them with supplies. Five individuals, handpicked by the church leadership team, received four days of intensive first aid training including: wound care, blood pressure monitoring, taking temperatures, and identifying critical symptoms. Each participant received an instruction manual and access to an emergency medical pack stored at the local church. In the future, Dr. Jean is hopeful that she will be able to provide some ongoing support and perhaps offer additional training for community volunteers with first aid experience.

This mobile clinic is a unique opportunity to share the love of Christ and meet practical needs in this very vulnerable community. Pastor and Dr. Jeans’ dream is to one day open a permanent clinic in this area where they can engage in a total healing ministry, addressing both the physical and spiritual needs of every patient.